A day in the life of Kasanka!

Saturday the 14 November proved to be quite an exciting, jam-packed day for everyone visiting Kasanka! Wasa Lodge manager Chris Meyer sent through the following report of the day’s events.

All photos © Chris Meyer

·  The morning started with 14 guests in the BBC hide mesmerized by the return of nearly 8 million bats from their nightly forage of wild fruits!

· The evening saw 34 guests converge at the Fibwe public viewing area and 2 guests in the BBC hide from the various lodges and camp sites to stand amazed at the emerging bats from the forest at dusk which lasted up to 30 minutes

Fibwe-public-view-point
· Guests from the verandah at Wasa Lodge saw sable antelope on 3 occasions during the morning as well as 2 bull elephant cooling off in the shallow muddy waters on the edge of Lake Wasa. Elephant and sable have been regular visitors to Lake Wasa during the past few weeks

· A puku carcass discovered by the ZAWA ranger across the lake with no obvious signs of cause of death was quickly devoured by a number of vultures; including White-backed, Hooded and a lone White-headed vulture
· Guests on a game drive saw a large black mamba which caused some excitement and fear!
· Birding enthusiasts were able to add to their checklists following a walk along the forest edge at Fibwe as well as a drive along the Kasanka River and through the miombo woodlands. These included Ross’s Turaco, Forest weaver, Red-throated twin spot, Black-throated Wattle-eye, Dickenson’s Kestrel amongst others

Hunting-for-a-snack
· There was a very welcome shower of rain, only the second for the season in the early evening, the park although still dry will soon start to blossom with some wild flowers already starting to bloom.

Rain-storm-over-Lake-Wasa

3 comments to “A day in the life of Kasanka!”

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  1. Seeing the bats was a dream come true. I loved Kasanka. Loved the moment one of our party got all excited because there was a hippo in the long! We were a group of bat people and the “Hippo” in question was a Hipposiderid, which flew off pretty smarties, before we could identify it further.

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