Guidebook

Habitats and Wildife in Kasanka

Papyrus Swamps

Papyrus Swamps

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
Papyrus swamps are often referred to as Kasanka’s crown jewels. Dense growths of the plant Cyperus papyrus are easily distinguished by the tufted balls at the end of a long triangular stalk. Papyrus forms islands or rafts of floating vegetation and requires areas of open water to thrive. The impenetrable vegetation is an important refuge for Kasanka’s second most famous resident: the shy Sitatunga, with splayed hoofs specifically adapted to navigated the floating tangled roots and muddy marshes.
Papyrus is typically associated with open water. By far the largest area is found in the famous Fibwe Swamp, which has formed along the Musola Stream. The equally famous Fibwe Hide, 12m up a Mahogany tree, overlooks it and is easily reached from either Wasa or Pontoon Campsite.
For obvious reasons Papyrus swamps cannot be accessed by either road or boat. By far the best opportunity to view this vegetation type is from the Fibwe hide itself.

Animal Species found in the area

Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Sitatunga

 

Few large animals are able to survive in dense stands or islands of exclusively Papyrus. The Sitatunga is a flagship species associated with this habitat and a true specialist.

  
Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Bushpig

 

Where Papyrus occurs more marginally, other species such as Bushpig may make use of it during the drier times of year.

  
Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Serval

 

After significant fires, Serval have been observed hunting rodents in the Papyrus and sedge marshes immediately below the Fibwe hide.

  

Bird Species found in the area

Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Greater Swamp Warbler

 

Lesser and Greater Swamp Warbler are fairly common.

  
Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Large Golden Weaver

 

Frequently seen Large Golden Weaver is a favourite amongst birders.

  
Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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African Marsh Harrier

 

African Marsh Harriers fly low over the marsh looking out for Black Crakes

  
Papyrus Swamps in kasanka national park

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Shoebill

 

Most notably, however, have been recent sightings of Shoebill which may still be resident in the swamps.

  
lakes in kasanka national park

Lakes

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
Lakes in Kasanka differ in size, shape and seasonality. The permanent lakes of Wasa, Wasa II and Ndolwa are fringed by reeds, sedges and sometimes Papyrus with floating islands frequented by Fish Eagles.

Chisamba wa Mponde is a spring-fed marsh with some open water and many little islands frequented by Sitatunga and a plethora of waterbirds.

Lake Wasa is difficult to miss as it is the location of Kasanka’s primary lodge. A short drive away are Lakes Wasa II and III, with the latter drying up completely after the rains.

Chisamba wa Mponde is centrally located on the right when approaching Pontoon Campsite on the Kasanka River. It cannot be missed.

Kasanka’s lakes are best explored on foot. Boating is not allowed as to create a safe and pristine environment for the species that call it home. A walk along the shores of Lake Wasa or a picnic on the rise overlooking Lake Ndolwa is ultimately relaxing and rewarding for the observant birder.

Chisamba wa Mponde has a decent road circling it but is best enjoyed from a single vantage point or one of the nearby termite mounds with a pair of binoculars, plenty of time and a bird guide.

Animal Species found in the area

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Hippos & Crocs

 

Kasanka’s lakes are host to all the usual suspects such as Hippo’s and Crocs, especially in the core area, as well as a diversity of fish sometimes different from those found in the rivers and streams. Lake Wasa’s Hippo’s typically leave us between the months of January and May in favour of the Mulembo River and the more productive adjoining floodplains.

  
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Sable & Other

 

Lake Wasa is of seasonal importance to species such as Sable, Roan and even Elephants, which frequent the lake to drink between the months of September and November and are often encountered by visitors returning for breakfast from a rewarding game-drive.

  
lakes in kasanka national park

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Sitatunga & Other

 

Puku, Bushbuck, Sitatunga and Warthogs forage along the shoreline.

  

Bird species found here

lakes in kasanka national park

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White-faced Duck

 

Large flocks of White-faced Ducks may be heard and seen over Lake Wasa, whereas seasonally Spur-winged Geese congregate on the banks.

  
lakes in kasanka national park

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Jacanas

 

Both African and Lesser Jacana are common, as are a variety of Crakes and other more skulking species

  
lakes in kasanka national park

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Striped Crake

 

A highlight of recent years close to Lake Wasa has been regular sightings of the incredibly shy and rarely seen Striped Crake.

  
lakes in kasanka national park

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Goliath heron

 

Fish Eagles can be heard and seen soaring overhead, whereas Goliath and Purple Herons are often seen in the shallows.

  
rivers in kasanka national park

Rivers

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
Kasanka NP is part of the Congo basin and is well drained by several larger rivers, namely the Mulembo, Kasanka and Luwombwa Rivers. Each have large and productive grassy floodplains which are submerged during the months of January-April, forming an important spawning ground for fish, and may be fringed by thick stands of Phragmites reeds or relic patches of evergreen forest.
The Kasanka River is a central feature in the Park and is most easily reached from Wasa Lodge. A network of driving trails on either side make for excellent game-viewing. Both Kabwe and Pontoon Campsites overlook a part of the Kasanka River, whereas Bufumu Campsite is perched on a slight rise above the Mulembo River overlooking the floodplain and adjoining riparian forest. Luwombwa Lodge is beautifully located on a wide bend on the river, offering some of the best fishing in the Park. Of the all the streams in Kasanka, the Musola is the easiest and most rewarding to explore, particularly between Bupata Bridge and Pontoon Camp. The floodplains of the Kasanka Rivers between Kapabi and Kabwe boast Kasanka’s densest mammal populations.
One of the most relaxing and rewarding experiences in the Park is canoeing down the Luwombwa River. This is best done during the drier months of the year (August-November) when water-levels are low and the current manageable.

During the wetter months, a motorboat trip can be just as rewarding and allows one to cover a longer stretch of river. Navigating the Kasanka is unfortunately not possible, but a network of game-viewing roads make up for this with great sightings and beautiful vista’s.

Fishermen are well accommodated at Luwombwa and can either rent a small motorboat or launch their own downstream from the camp.

Animal Species found in the area

rivers in kasanka national park

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Puku & Other

 

Hundreds of Puku’s, dozens of Bushbuck, Duiker, Warthogs, Baboons and more can be found foraging in this very productive habitat.

  
rivers in kasanka national park

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Sitatunga

 

In the early mornings and late afternoons, Sitatunga are easily spotted, with as many as 40+ individuals counted during a single drive! The floodplain immediately opposite Pontoon Campsite is perhaps the best and most rewarding place to photograph Sitatunga in the Park, if not the world!

  
rivers in kasanka national park

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Crocodiles

 

Crocodiles bask during the hot daylight hours and some real beasts can be found sunning downstream from Pontoon. Hippo’s are common but display seasonal movements.

  
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Elephants

 

Elephants are easily found between the months of June and August, feeding on reeds along the river’s edge.

  
rivers in kasanka national park

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Side-striped Jackal & Other

 

Night-drives are likely to reveal a variety of Mongoose, Bushbabies and Side-striped Jackals.

  

Bird species found here

rivers in kasanka national park

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Kingfishers

 

Pied, Malachite and Half-collared Kingfishers can often be spotted along the banks as White-fronted Bee-eaters swoop overhead.

  
rivers in kasanka national park

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Coppery-tailed Coucal & Others

 

The sedges and reeds fringing many of the rivers are home to species such as Marsh Tchagra, Coppery-tailed Coucals, a variety of warblers and a diversity of passerines such as weavers, widowbirds and bishops.

  
rivers in kasanka national park

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Pel's Fishing Owl & Others

 

Most notably, perhaps, the forests along the Mulembo and Luwombwa Rivers are home to very visible Pel’s Fishing Owl and White-backed Nightheron, whereas Finfoots and Black Ducks may also be seen.

  

Other interesting sights

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Kasanka Sunsets

 

Perhaps the best place to view and photograph the sunset over Kasanka NP is along the eastern bank of the Kasanka River, between Pontoon and Old Kabwe

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
A very rare and threatened vegetation type with a very limited range in Kasanka and beyond. The Bufumu Forest and some of the adjoining woodlands are protected by a network of firebreaks to allow the surrounding Chipya a chance to regenerate and the forest to expand once more. Several similarly tall trees grow inside the forest, but none are quite as high.
Most notably, Bufumu Forest consists primarily of Mateshe forest. The roughly 5 hectares of forest are well-protected by firebreaks and the adjacent campsite makes it easy for self-drivers to visit and explore. For visitors at our Lodges, Bufumu is closest to Luwombwa but may be visited from either Lodge on a half-day trip taking into account a casual game-drive and plenty of time to explore the forest.
As Mateshe is so rare in the Park they can only be explored on foot. Most easily accessible is Bufumu Forest and this should not be missed by any visitor to Kasanka.

The newly discovered Western Mateshe and the patches in the Kabumba area are difficult to access, but those visitors not shy of venturing off the beaten track are able to explore under the supervision of guide.

Animal Species found in the area

Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Bushbuck & Others

 

Much like the Mushitu Forests, Mateshe harbours Bushbuck, Bushpig, Monkeys and Baboons.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Buffalo

 

Buffalo are commonly found on the southern edges of the Bufumu Forest.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Bushbabies

 

Bushbabies frequent the tall trees, as do the loud and interesting Tree Hyrax.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Blue Duiker

 

Perhaps most interestingly, Blue Duiker (Philantomba monticola) were discovered for the first time in 2013 and represented a new ungulate to be added to Kasanka’s mammal list.

  

Bird species found in the area

Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Trumpeter Hornbill & Others

 

Trumpeter and Crowned Hornbills abound, as do both species of Turaco, Green Pigeons and Black-backed Barbets.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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White backed Vulture & Others

 

Bufumu notably supports a number of White-backed Vulture nests and Crowned Eagle are regularly seen in the area.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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African Pitta & Others

 

Olive Sunbirds and African Broadbill are often spotted in and around Bufumu, which is visited seasonally by the rare and enigmatic African Pitta, which might well breed in the forest.

  

Other interesting sights

Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Bufumu Tree

 

Perhaps the biggest drawcard of this unique patch of evergreen forest, criss-crossed by Bushpig and Duiker trails, is the Bufumu Tree itself. Standing 67m tall, this ‘Mofwe’ or Wooden Banana is the tallest tree in Zambia and dominates the surrounding landscape standing thirty or so metres away from the forest.

  
Mateshe Dry Evergreen Forest in Kasanka

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Canopy Tower

 

The newly built Canopy Platform on the edge of the forest gives visitors the unique opportunity to observe the forest from above, appreciate the magnificence of the ‘Bufumu Tree’ from afar and bird from a perfect vantage point.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest

Mushitu Swamp Forest

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
‘uMushitu’ is the local name for what is otherwise known as ‘Zambian Swamp Forest’, a type of evergreen forest reminiscent of the dense tropical forests of the Congo basin. It typically grows on organic soils, often where thick layers of peat occur. The Bat Forest at Fibwe consists of Seepage Mushitu, dominated by Swamp Figs (Ficus trichopida) and Waterberries (Syzygium spp.) Generally dominated by a variety of evergreen tree species such as Red Mahogany (Khaya anthoteca), African Ebony (Diospyros mespiliformis) and the Quinine tree (Rauvolfa caffra) as well as pioneer shrubs such as the False Assegai (Maesa lanceolata). Due to its evergreen nature, mushitu species tend to be intolerant of fire and therefore the range of this vegetation type has been reduced drastically in recent times.
By far the largest remaining tract of Mushitu occurs at Fibwe, along the Musola stream. The area is most easily visited from Wasa Lodge or Pontoon Campsite Musande, upstream of Luwombwa Lodge, is home to a fairly large remaining tract of seasonally-flooded and riparian forest, whereas significant patches remain elsewhere along the Luwombwa and Mulembo Rivers as well. For self-drivers Pontoon campsite presents our visitors with the unique opportunity to camp inside a beautiful patch of Mushitu among towering Red Mahoganies.
As there are no roads through the forest, Mushitu is best explored on foot, in the early mornings or late afternoons although the Bat Forest is strictly off-limits when the Bats are present.

A lovely walk from Pontoon Campsite, along the Kasanka River and through the forests of the Kasanka/Musola Confluence and Fibwe to the hide overlooking the swamps and coming back along Chinyangale Plain showcases much of what the Mushitu has to offer.

The riparian forests along the Luwombwa River and all they have to offer are best experienced by motorboat or canoe.

To experience the Bats and look down on the largest Mushitu in Kasanka, nothing beats the BBC-hide, perched high atop a Mahogany tree.

Bird-watching above the canopy is great and several smaller hides inside the forest complement our pride and joy!

Animal Species found in the area

Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Fruit Bats

 

Without a doubt the most famous residents are the Straw-coloured Fruitbats, which visit Mishutu Forrest by the millions (literally!) each year between October and December

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Blue Monkey

 

A real Mushitu ‘specials’ is without a doubt the Blue Monkey. Unlike Vervets, these agile climbers are adapted to an almost exclusively arboreal lifestyle and will not stray from the dense evergreen foliage.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Bushbuck

 

Bushbuck are commonly seen along the Mushitu edges.

  

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Leopard

 

Leopard prowl the forests of Fibwe and their dung and spoor can regularly be found on the tracks and trails in and around the Bat Forest.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Serval

 

Sightings of Serval are relatively common around the Fibwe forest, especially during dry season.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Elephants

 

Elephants may seasonally frequent Mushitu to escape the heat of the day or forage.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Kinda Baboons

 

A habituated troop of Kinda Baboons often chooses the tall trees as their roosts, where they are easily observed.

  

Bird Species found in the area

Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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African Crowned Eagle

 

Forest margins are often haunted by Western Banded Snake Eagle, whereas several pairs of Crowned Eagle nest in the Park.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Turaco & Others

 

Turaco’s, both Ross’ and Schallow’s, as well as Black-backed Barbets and Bohm’s Bee-eaters represent some of the more visible favourites.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Dark-capped Forest Weaver & Others

 

Keen birders will be happy to find a full complement of other forest-dwellers: Cabanis’, Grey-Olive and Little Greenbul, Terrestrial Brownbul, Yellow-throated Leaflove, Purple-throated Cuckooshrike, Square-tailed Drongo, White-browed Robinchat and Dark-capped Forest Weaver to name but a few.

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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African Pitta & Others

 

African Pitta have been sighted at Fibwe at the right time of year and respond well to recordings.

  

Other interesting sights

Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Red Mahogany

 

The golf-ball shaped pods of the Red Mahogany (Khaya anthoteca) are a favourite of many visitors as once dry, they pop open revealing the seeds and looking like a beautiful wooden flower!

  
Mushitu Swamp Forest in kasanka national park

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Gaboon Adder

 

Look out for the difficult-to-observe but oh-so-striking Gaboon Adder which calls these forests home!

  

Miombo Woodland

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
A wooded savannah separating the Acacia-dominated savannah’s of the East and South Afric with the lush tropical forests of Central Africa. Characterised by a broken canopy, a moderately develop short grass level, Miombo is noted for three primary genera of tree: Brachystegia, Julbernardia and Isoberlinia.
Over 70% of Kasanka’s surface area is covered by Miombo woodlands so one need not travel far to be fully immersed. There is, however, great variety even within the woodlands themselves. The drive from the entrance gate takes one through very mature Miombo where tall trees are widely dispersed, whereas the woodlands closest to Fibwe are short and dense.
Most commonly, Baboons may be found foraging whereas Duiker are also observed as are Bushbabies, Genets and Civets at night. Although rarely seen, signs of one of Kasanka’s often overlooked residents, the Aardvark, are commonly found in the vast woodlands to the south and east of Wasa as well as the area west of the Luwombwa River.

Animal Species found in the area

Miombo Woodland

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Hartebeest

 

Lichtenstein’s Hartbeest is only found between the Kasanka and Luwombwa Rivers.

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Buffalo

 

Kasanka’s Buffalo also enjoy the woodlands and spend much time here during the day but are difficult to observe.

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Sable

 

Sable are relatively common throughout. However, the nomadic nature of the species as well as the vastness of the woodlands makes encounters unpredictable.

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Baboon

 

Baboons can often be found foraging

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Roan

 

Roan are thought to occur only east of the Kasanka.

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Duiker

 

Most commonly, Baboons may be found foraging whereas Duiker are also observed as are Bushbabies, Genets and Civets at night

  

Bird species found in the area

Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Racket-tailed Roller & Others

 

Coqui Francolin, Racket-tailed Roller, Spotted Creeper and Arnot’s Chat may sometimes be spotted from the roadside and Ground Hornbill can be heard calling the in early mornings.

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Miombo Pied Barbet & Others

 

Anchieta’s, Whyte’s and Miombo Pied Barbet also found in the area

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Golden-tailed Woodpecker & Others

 

Green-backed Honeybird, Bennett’s, Bearded and Golden-tailed Woodpeckers

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Miombo Scrub Robin & Others

 

Miombo Scrub-Robin, Green-capped, Black-collared and Yellow-bellied Eremomela’s

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Yellow-bellied Hyliota & Others

 

Southern and Yellow-bellied Hyliota

  
Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Purple banded Sunbird & Others

 

Anchieta’s and Purple-banded Sunbirds are among the other specials found in the Miombo.

  

Other interesting sights

Miombo Woodland in kasanka national park

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Aardvark

 

Although rarely seen, signs of one of Kasanka’s often overlooked residents, the Aardvark, are commonly found in the vast woodlands to the south and east of Wasa as well as the area west of the Luwombwa River.

  
Dambo Grassland

Dambo Grassland

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
Large, open grasslands scattered with the odd termite mounds. Prone to flooding in the wet season as they effectively, shallow basins.
Dambo’s and grasslands are dotted throughout Kasanka and one need not travel far to find them. Most notable and easily reached are the plains surrounding the Wasa system and Kalamba close to Wasa Lodge, during dry season, and Chikufwe Plain a short drive from Luwombwa.
Kasanka’s Dambo’s are well-represented in our network of game-viewing and access roads. Therefore, game-viewing is most easily done from the comfort of a vehicle. However, given the forgiving nature of the terrain, early morning walks can also be very rewarding and comfortable.

Serious birders will want to venture out on foot in order to flush quails, larks and pipits that call the plains home and get close enough to identify the species.

Animal Species found in the area

Dambo Grassland

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Reedbuck

 

Common Reedbuck may be found in the drier upper catchments of Kasanka’s Dambo’s all year round.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Buffalo

 

Buffalo often use the drainage lines to move between feeding sites and water. Signs abound along Chikufwe and Kafubashi Dambo’s but sightings are sporadic and unpredictable.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Hartebeest

 

Chikufwe is a likely place to spot Hartebeest between the months of July and August, when the plains are freshly burnt.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Sable

 

Chikufwe is a likely place to spot Sable between the months of July and August, when the plains are freshly burnt.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Roan

 

Roan are sometimes sighted around the New Mulembo Airstrip during July and August but are rare.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Zebra

 

Zebra are quite commonly sighted at New Mulembo and on the plains around Wasa III and Kalamba Dambo.

  

Bird Species found in the area

Dambo Grassland

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Harlequin Quail & Other

 

Blue and Harlequin Quails, Kurichane and Black-rumped Buttonquails, Corncrakes, Streaky-breasted Fluff-tails.

  
Dambo Grassland

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African Grass Owl

 

Grass Owl has been recorded once in Kasanka on Chikufwe Plain. The wet months, December to April offer the best chance of success.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Fuelleborne’s Longclaw

 

Fuelleborne’s Longclaw are sometimes sighted, but rare.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Wattled Crane

 

A single pair of Wattled Crane breed in the Park and can often be found on the exposed grasslands of the shallower Wasa lakes during the dry season.

  

Other interesting sights

Dambo Grassland

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Pyjama Lillies

 

Other interesting flowering plants such as Pyjama Lillies can periodically turn the fresh green plains awash in yellow, pink and orange following the first rains.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Pineapple flowers

 

Pineapple flowers can periodically turn the fresh green plains awash in yellow, pink and orange following the first rains.

  
Dambo Grassland

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Grey Termitaria

 

Another interesting feature of the Park’s Dambo’s are the endless ‘fields’ of low, grey termitaria. Once the flying termites emerge with the rains these areas attract an incredible variety of wildlife to take advantage of this prolific source of protein.

  
Chipya Woodland

Chipya Woodland

Guidebook content credited to Bastiaan Boon

  • What Does it Look like?
  • Where is it found in the park (closest lodge as well).
  • Best Experienced (on foot, boat, canoe, hide or vehicle?)
From the Bemba word ‘ukupya’, meaning to burn: a burnt woodland. Often dominated by a sub-stratum of herbaceous plants such as ‘wild ginger’ under a broken canopy of the more regular miombo species and a scattering of large evergreen trees such as the Mupundu (Parinari curatelifolia). It is thought that these woodlands derive from dry evergreen forests which used to be much more widespread before the advent of anthropogenic fires in the region.
The area between the Kasanka and Luwombwa Rivers boasts some significant patches, particularly the main road leading up to the Kafubashi Dambo (Chipya wa Milando), the Musande area and the road after Chikufwe Plain and the area surrounding the very special Bufumu Forest. This habitat is most easily explored from Luwombwa Lodge or Bufumu Campsite.
Due to the relatively low diversity and density of game, Chipya woodlands are usually only visited by vehicle when traversing the Park. However, if appropriately dressed (long pants and sleeves), a walk through the ‘burnt woodlands’ of Kasanka might lead to a rewarding sighting or two.

Mammal Species found here

Chipya Woodland

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Bushpig

 

Bushpig are often found in Chipya and their sleeping sites and dung litter the vegetation. Bushpig are most easily flushed south of the Bufumu Forest at any time of year, though more commonly during the dry months (June onwards).

  
Chipya Woodland

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Bushbuck & Grysbok

 

Bushbuck are common and Grysbok, otherwise rare in the Park, may sometimes be seen here.

  
Chipya Woodland

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Elephants

 

From August to November, Elephants frequent the Chipya closest to Luwombwa and along the Mulembo River to feed on Mupundu fruits.

  

Bird specials found here

Chipya Woodland

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African Broadbill

 

Chipya woodlands typically boasts species associated with both evergreen forests and miombo. African Broadbill are fairly easy to find as are a host of other species traditionally associated with thicket.

  

Other interesting sights

Chipya Woodland

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Wild Ginger

 

Wild Ginger (Aframomum spp) forms a dense understory during the rainy season, which burns almost entirely from July onwards. It produces an edible wild fruit at the base of its stem. The fleshy seeds of this fruit have a sharp taste reminiscent of ginger, though it bears no relation to the edible root. Elsewhere further south similar species are threatened due to their use in traditional medicine. easily observed in the area surrounding the Bufumu Forest and south of Musande from January until June.

  
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